It’s Here! Introducing V-Meat, The “V” Word’s Gluten-Free Answer to Seitan

V-Sausage  (1)

 

Seitan and vital wheat gluten are magical. They are. They let us make food that is so close to animal meat, it’s scary. They add stretch and elasticity to food and give it that “chewy” texture we want in burgers, cutlets, steaks and more. But what happens if you’re gluten-free? Beyond Meat is amazing but I can’t get it where I live so I had to figure something else out.

I have made recipes for gluten-free versions of the foods that usually contain gluten. You all know about my Gluten-Free Italian Sausage and Breakfast Sausage. If you don’t, check them out. They are very popular.

I have made burgers with all types of beans, TVP, eggplant and lentils. They are all delicious.

My Sorta Seitan Cutlets use only 25% of the gluten that regular seitan uses and they are amazing.

But I wanted a gluten-free version of seitan.

I searched the internet. There are some gluten-free seitan recipes out there. I tried them all. I hated them all. I’m serious. None of them tasted like seitan. None of them tasted like meat. I know I can’t expect something that doesn’t have gluten to taste exactly like seitan but these recipes weren’t even close. They all tasted like bread. I wasted a ton of ingredients and threw whole loaves of gluten-free seitan in the garbage. There is a boxed mix of gluten-free seitan you can buy but it’s just full of starches and sounds really unappetizing.

So I set to work on creating a type of gluten-free vegan meat that tasted good, that I would actually want to eat, that would be relatively healthy and that would pass the test of a meat-eater. After months and months of experiments, learning and coming to understand the reason behind each ingredient, eating less-than-perfect batches and changing the recipe multiple times, I finally made the batch that said, “Yes, this is it!”

Seitan and V-Meat. Which is which? Can you tell?

Seitan and V-Meat. Which is which? Can you tell?

 

It doesn’t have the elasticity of gluten but it does have a similar taste, especially when prepared into dishes. Like seitan, you don’t just make it and eat it. You have to use it in recipes, season it, cook it, make it savory and delicious. After all, it is just dough so you have to season it generously and infuse the most flavor possible.

It can be formed into patties, balls, logs, cutlets, steaks, roasts and it can be sliced. I have used it to make French Dips, Pot Roasts, Stuffed Roasts, Burgers, Ribs, Sausages, and more. Here are some pictures that show how I have used it.

v meat (12)-tile

I didn’t want to call it gluten-free seitan since it might get confusing. After all, it is NOT seitan. It doesn’t taste like seitan. So I named it V-Meat. And then came V-Chicken, V-Sausage and V-Turkey. Each name describes what it tastes like. And “V” because it’s vegan and from The “V” Word. 🙂

It’s one basic recipe and then you can change up the seasonings and flavors to make it however you like. V-Italian Sausage can become V-Breakfast Sausage by switching from spicy seasonings to the ones usually found in breakfast sausage like maple, apple and sage. The possibilities are endless.

V-Sausage Sandwich (3)

V-Meat is gluten-free. It contains oats so make sure to get certified gluten-free oats if you have celiac disease or are gluten-intolerant. I tried to make it without oats. I tried quinoa, rice and millet but it didn’t work right. Oats gave it that “chew” that other grains didn’t.

v meat (21)

If you need V-Meat to be soy-free, you can simply swap out the soy flour for quinoa flour or rice flour and use Bragg’s coconut aminos instead of soy sauce (when it’s needed). But I will say that I made a few soy-free versions and it does taste a little better with the soy.

One thing that really surprised me: chickpea flour, my favorite flour, the flour I think runs through my veins (if flour could run through your veins) DOES NOT WORK. I made a million batches with it and couldn’t figure out why it tasted so much like bread. I thought it was the other ingredients. Then I took out the chickpea flour and TA DA! It was so much better. Don’t use chickpea flour.

High-protein flours are needed like soy flour, amaranth flour and pea protein and I added very little starch. I use arrowroot but you could use corn starch or tapioca starch. It does need the xanthan or guar gum. I tried it without it. It doesn’t hold up. Every ingredient that is in my recipe is there for a reason. By the way, you can find pea protein in health food stores, natural markets or online at Amazon, Vitacost, Swanson Vitamins and any place that sells health and fitness products.

V-Chicken Dough

V-Chicken Dough

 

When you make the dough, you could just fry it right up but it tastes much better if you steam it first. It really solidifies the ingredients so you can do whatever you want with it afterwards. You also don’t have to wait hours to use it but again, it tasted a bit better to me when I did.

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I hope you have fun with V-Meat and the other versions. V-Chicken and V-Sausage are my personal  favorites. All of the versions have been meat-eater approved! Please share with us what you do with it. I really hope it adds another choice to your menu. Enjoy!

 

V-Meat

V-eat (4)

GF

 

1 “beef” flavored bouillon cubes +

1 cup boiling water or 1 cup “beef” broth

1/3 cup rolled oats

¼ cup soy flour

¼ cup amaranth flour

¼ cup pea protein

2 Tbs. arrowroot powder

2 tsp. xanthan or guar gum

3 Tbs. vegetable oil

4 Tbs. tomato paste

3 Tbs. gluten-free, low-sodium tamari or soy sauce

2 Tbs. nutritional yeast

2 Tbs. flaxseed

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. paprika

1 tsp. onion powder

1 tsp. garlic powder

1 tsp. dried oregano

1 tsp. ground cumin

1 tsp. ground coriander

½ tsp. black pepper

 

Set up a pot of boiling water with a steamer inserted. In a small saucepan, dissolve the bouillon cube in boiling water to make “beef” broth. In a bowl, combine the rolled oats and 1/3 cup of broth. Mix and let sit for 10 minutes or until the broth is completely absorbed. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, add the soy flour, amaranth flour, pea protein, arrowroot and xanthan or guar gum. Stir well to combine.

In a smaller bowl, combine the vegetable oil, tomato paste, tamari, nutritional yeast, flaxseed, seasoning and 1/3 cup of broth. Mix well to combine. Add the cooked oatmeal to the wet ingredients and stir until everything is well combined.

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl with the dry ingredients. Using a rubber spatula, mix until you have a dough. Then wet your hand and knead the dough in the bowl until it feels smooth and holds together. If the dough feels too wet or loose, add more soy or amaranth flour. If the dough feels too dry, wet your hands and knead rather than adding water to the dough. You add less water this way. When you are happy with the consistency of the dough, let it rest for 10 minutes. It should be a bit sticky and not too dry.

Divide the dough into 4 sections. Shape each section into the shape you want – round or oval patties, logs, etc. – if you are making patties, make them very thin as they will expand during the steaming process. Alternatively, you could shape the entire dough into a log to make a roast. Let them sit again for 5 minutes. Wrap each piece in foil and steam them for 20 minutes. Remove the packets from the steamer, let them cool and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight. When you are ready to cook them, take them out of the fridge and let them come to room temperature. Prepare them however you want.

 

V-Chicken

V-Chicken (18)

GF

 

1 “chicken” flavored bouillon cube

1 cup boiling water

1/3 cup rolled oats

¼ cup soy flour

¼ cup amaranth flour

¼ cup pea protein

2 Tbs. arrowroot powder

2 tsp. xanthan or guar gum

3 Tbs. vegetable oil

2 Tbs. nutritional yeast

2 Tbs. flaxseed

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. dried thyme

1 tsp. dried sage

2 Tbs. grated carrot

 

Set up a pot of boiling water with a steamer inserted. In a small saucepan, dissolve the bouillon cube in boiling water to make “chicken” broth. In a bowl, combine the rolled oats and 1/3 cup of broth. Mix and let sit for 10 minutes or until the broth is completely absorbed. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, add the soy flour, amaranth flour, pea protein, arrowroot and xanthan or guar gum. Stir well to combine.

In a smaller bowl, combine the vegetable oil, nutritional yeast, flaxseed, seasoning and 1/3 cup of broth. Mix well to combine. Add the cooked oatmeal to the wet ingredients and stir until everything is well combined.

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl with the dry ingredients. Fold in the carrots. Using a rubber spatula, mix until you have a dough. Then wet your hand and knead the dough in the bowl until it feels smooth and holds together. If the dough feels too wet or loose, add more soy or amaranth flour. If the dough feels too dry, wet your hands and knead rather than adding water to the dough. You add less water this way. When you are happy with the consistency of the dough, let it rest for 10 minutes. It should be a bit sticky and not too dry.

Divide the dough into 4 sections. Shape each section into the shape you want – round or oval patties, logs, etc. – if you are making patties, make them very thin as they will expand during the steaming process. Alternatively, you could shape the entire dough into a log to make a roast. Let them sit again for 5 minutes. Wrap each piece in foil and steam them for 20 minutes. Remove the packets from the steamer, let them cool and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight. When you are ready to cook them, take them out of the fridge and let them come to room temperature. Prepare them however you want.

 

V-Turkey

turkey cutlets (5)

GF

 

For the “poultry” seasoning mix­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ (makes 2 ½ Tbs. worth)

1 ½ tsp. ground sage

1 ½ tsp. ground thyme

1 tsp. ground marjoram

1 Tbs. fresh parsley, chopped

½ tsp. ground rosemary

½ tsp. celery seed

½ tsp. ground allspice

½ tsp. black pepper

½ tsp. onion powder

½ tsp. kosher salt

 

For the V-Turkey

1 “chicken” flavored bouillon cube

1 cup boiling water

1/3 cup rolled oats

¼ cup soy flour

¼ cup amaranth flour

¼ cup pea protein

2 Tbs. arrowroot powder

2 tsp. xanthan or guar gum

3 Tbs. vegetable oil

2 Tbs. low-sodium tamari or soy sauce

2 Tbs. nutritional yeast

2 Tbs. flaxseed

1 Tbs. “poultry” seasoning

2 Tbs. grated carrot

1 Tbs. fresh parsley, chopped

 

Set up a pot of boiling water with a steamer inserted. In a small saucepan, dissolve the bouillon cube in boiling water to make “chicken” broth. In a bowl, combine the rolled oats and 1/3 cup of broth. Mix and let sit for 10 minutes or until the broth is completely absorbed. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, add the soy flour, amaranth flour, pea protein, arrowroot and xanthan or guar gum. Stir well to combine.

In a smaller bowl, combine the vegetable oil, tamari, nutritional yeast, flaxseed, seasoning and 1/3 cup of broth. Mix well to combine. Add the cooked oatmeal to the wet ingredients and stir until everything is well combined.

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl with the dry ingredients. Fold in the carrots and fresh parsley. Using a rubber spatula, mix until you have a dough. Then wet your hand and knead the dough in the bowl until it feels smooth and holds together. If the dough feels too wet or loose, add more soy or amaranth flour. If the dough feels too dry, wet your hands and knead rather than adding water to the dough. You add less water this way. When you are happy with the consistency of the dough, let it rest for 10 minutes. It should be a bit sticky and not too dry.

Divide the dough into 4 sections. Shape each section into the shape you want – round or oval patties, logs, etc. – if you are making patties, make them very thin as they will expand during the steaming process. Alternatively, you could shape the entire dough into a log to make a roast. Let them sit again for 5 minutes. Wrap each piece in foil and steam them for 20 minutes. Remove the packets from the steamer, let them cool and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight. When you are ready to cook them, take them out of the fridge and let them come to room temperature. Prepare them however you want.

 

V-Sausage, Italian

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GF

 

For the Spice Mix­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

1 ½ tsp. garlic powder

1 ½ tsp. fennel, crushed

½ tsp. black pepper

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 ½ tsp. sweet paprika

1 ½ tsp. smoked paprika

½ tsp. red pepper flakes

1 tsp. dried oregano

1/8 tsp. allspice

 

For the Sausages­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

1 cup low-sodium vegetable broth

1/3 cup rolled oats

¼ cup soy flour

¼ cup amaranth flour

¼ cup pea protein

2 Tbs. arrowroot powder

2 tsp. xanthan or guar gum

3 Tbs. vegetable oil

3 Tbs. gluten-free vegan Worcestershire sauce

A few drops of Liquid Smoke (optional)

2 Tbs. nutritional yeast

2 Tbs. flaxseed

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. dried thyme

1 tsp. dried sage

 

Set up a pot of boiling water with a steamer inserted. Heat the vegetable broth until boiling. Prepare the spice mix and set aside. In a bowl, combine the rolled oats and 1/3 cup of the hot broth. Mix and let sit for 10 minutes or until the broth is completely absorbed. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, add the soy flour, amaranth flour, pea protein, arrowroot and xanthan or guar gum.  Stir well to combine.

In a smaller bowl, combine the vegetable oil, Worcestershire sauce, and Liquid Smoke, if using. Add 1/3 cup broth and the spice mixture. Whisk until smooth. Add the cooked oatmeal and stir until everything is well combined.

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl with the dry ingredients. Using a rubber spatula, mix until you have a dough. Then wet your hand and knead the dough in the bowl until it feels smooth and holds together. If the dough feels too wet or loose, add more soy or amaranth. If the dough feels too dry, wet your hands and knead rather than adding water to the dough. You add less water this way. When you are happy with the consistency of the dough, let it rest for 10 minutes.

Divide the mixture into 4 parts. Shape each part into a log. Wrap the logs individually in foil and steam them for 20 minutes. Let them cool. Then refrigerate for a few hours or overnight, if possible. This will help them firm up even more.

When ready to use, unwrap and cook them however you desire. We cook them on a grill pan and top them with mustard and either sautéed bell peppers and onions or my I Y NYC Red Onion Sauce (which you can find in The “V” Word Cookbook Preview. It’s free. Just email info@thevword.net to request one.)

V-Chicken (3)

The “V” Word: Say it. Eat it. Live it.

 

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114 Responses to It’s Here! Introducing V-Meat, The “V” Word’s Gluten-Free Answer to Seitan

  1. Dinna May 10, 2016 at 2:40 am #

    I have recently found out I have a severe gluten intolerance, having been vegan for 6 years I am incredibly thankful to have found some GF recipes!

    • Rhea May 18, 2016 at 2:30 pm #

      Glad you found me too Dinna!

      • Ashlee October 19, 2016 at 7:52 am #

        How is this gluten free?? Oats contain gluten. Can you suggest a substitute?

        • Shannon Cuoco October 19, 2016 at 11:30 am #

          Ashlee, oats themselves do not contain gluten, but are often processed on equipment in facilities that also process wheat, so there’s a high chance of cross contamination. Its very simple to find oats labelled gluten free that are processed in equipment dedicated only to oats and other non-glutinous grains.

  2. Jeff November 26, 2015 at 6:48 pm #

    Hey Rhea!

    Great article. Just wondering if you could tell me about the ingredient “pea protein”. I can’t find it at my health food store, other than in the protein powders for making shakes. Is that what you are referring to?

    Thanks!

    • Shannon November 27, 2015 at 8:16 am #

      Hey Jeff…not speaking for Rhea, but I asked her the same question, and yes, that’s just what you want- the plain pea protein powder alongside all the other protein drink mixes.

  3. Shannon August 22, 2015 at 6:48 pm #

    Hi there- SO happy to have found these recipes! I’m a vegan who has relatively recently gone GF because I discovered that gluten was what was exacerbating my cystic acne!
    I had a question about the pea protein…all I seem to find are the big tubs together with all the veg protein powder drink/shake mixes in the supplements section of the stores. Is this what you use? Or is there some culinary variety I’m supposed to be looking for? Thanks.

    • Rhea August 29, 2015 at 4:56 pm #

      Hi Shannon, sorry for the delay. I haven’t been visiting my own blog because I was busy with work. I have only tried it using pea protein. I’m not sure if pea flour is the same thing. I don’t think it is. The pea protein I used is the kind you put in smoothies as a supplement. xoxo

      • Shannon October 30, 2015 at 12:18 pm #

        Rhea, can you point me toward the recipe for the stuffed chicken V meat roast? Of course I see the recipe for the chicken mixture up there but not how to construct the actual roast. It frustrates me no end that companies like Field Roast, Gardein, and Tofurkey are completely ignoring the huge GF customer base for items like holiday roasts, so I’d really like to make my own.

        • Rhea November 17, 2015 at 10:11 pm #

          Sorry it took so long for me to reply Shannon. I explained how I made it in another reply to you. It’s really easy. I agree, there are not enough GF options for T-Day. xoxo

      • Shannon at The Kinder kitchen November 13, 2015 at 1:26 pm #

        Hi, Rhea, just thought I’d try again to see if I could get some guidance on making a roast…I experimented with the turkey v meat recipe and like it as cutlets just fine, but I’d really like to try to make a stuffed roast like you have pictured. What did you stuff it with? And did you roll/stuff, then steam it? I can’t seem to find a recipe anywhere on your blog. Thanks!

        • Rhea November 17, 2015 at 10:08 pm #

          Hi Shannon, the V-Meat roast was stuffed with (trying to remember) spinach or kale sauteed with breadcrumbs and vegan mozzarella. Probably. It was a while ago. There is no recipe on the blog for the V-Roast but there is one for a stuffed seitan roast you can look at. It’s way in the beginning of the blog.

          Basically, the V-Roast was making V-Chicken or V-Meat like the recipe says but making enough for a roast. Then spreading the dough out in a long piece, topping with filling and rolling it up. Then wrap it in foil and steam just like the cutlets. When it’s done steaming, either refrigerate it until you want to eat it or sear it in a pan with vegan butter to get the outside crisp. Top it with a glaze of your favorite kind. Sorry for the delay. xoxo

          • Marie Ward November 18, 2015 at 4:41 pm #

            It sounds wonderful but way too many ingredient for me to handle. wish it was available to purchase I am too old to cook/
            marie

          • Rhea November 19, 2015 at 8:20 pm #

            It is a lot of ingredients and work, Marie. Hopefully, one day some company will make it for gluten-free people. Until then, Beyond Meat is really good and GF. xoxo

    • Jeff November 26, 2015 at 6:50 pm #

      Lol!! I just realized you answered that question already. Embarrassing.

      Sorry for that.

      Cheers!

  4. Airyfairycelt May 23, 2015 at 2:44 am #

    Really! I look at recipes and see this seitan, stop and move on!
    It would be so useful. I am it sure about meat replacement as it about fifty years since I had meat but I do live with a carnivore and I often do two identical pots of food but one with meat and mine with many good things, lentils, beans, vegetables, and much more! I am a huge fan of spices and late coming to herbs I know but gently getting there!
    Very interesting site, another amazing cook to learn from and old ones keep learning!

    • Rhea May 26, 2015 at 5:34 pm #

      Thank you Airyfairy, I appreciate the kind words. Congratulations on so many meat-free years. You are such a great help to the animals! xoxo

  5. Franek May 11, 2015 at 4:19 am #

    Rhea, this looks amazing! Today my pea protein will arrive, they I can make my first V-beef batch! Can’t wait! 🙂
    What kind of spices/seasonings would you use to prepare a V-doner kebab? As well, do you think it’s possible to simmer the dough instead of steaming?

    • Rhea May 11, 2015 at 5:20 pm #

      Hi Franek, I had to look up the doner kebab and found that “a typical “Döner spice blend” includes a lot of black pepper and salt, followed by oregano or marjoram, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, and cinnamon.”

      I’ve never tried to simmer the dough but if it works, let me know please.

  6. Carla March 25, 2015 at 2:23 pm #

    I am steaming the v-meat, but after 20min the dough is still steaky, not hard. I am leaving a bit longer. Do you know why might have happened?

    • Rhea March 25, 2015 at 3:03 pm #

      Hi Carla,
      It won’t get hard but it should be firm. It shouldn’t have been sticky before it went in to get firm, just wet. Maybe too much liquid. It should firm up in the fridge though.

  7. Loz February 26, 2015 at 11:51 am #

    Just made the chicken version and then made a chicken stew with it. I loved it but I thought the v meat tasted like ‘sage’ rather than resembling chicken flavour, but that’s ok. I was wondering whether there was a list of herbs and spices that are listed that mimic various flavours. I see the chicken v meat only has thyme and sage in it apart from the stock! Any way still tasty and looking forward to next on my list, sausages. Thank you for all your help and recipes, much appreciated

    • Rhea February 26, 2015 at 12:41 pm #

      Hi Loz, I have written a bunch of articles on One Green Planet on how to make meatless food taste meaty. Here’s an excerpt from the article: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/tips-to-make-meatless-food-taste-meaty/

      After texture, seasoning is the recipe component that makes meat taste so good. After all, no one just eats plain meat without seasoning it, so why wouldn’t you do the same to vegetables? You can use the same spice mixes on vegetables that you would have used on meat. Poultry seasoning may be marketed for use on chicken and turkey, but guess what? It’s vegan. There is no actual poultry in poultry seasoning just as there is no steak in steak seasoning. These mixes are just blends of herbs and spices we have come to associate with meat. Combine sage, thyme, marjoram, rosemary, celery seed, allspice and black pepper to make your own “poultry” seasoning. Blend chile powder, paprika, oregano, cumin, coriander, mustard powder, brown sugar, salt and pepper to create your own spice rub for seitan steaks. To learn more about spices and seasonings, read “How to Stock Up Your Spice Cabinet for Delicious Vegan Cooking” and then check out “10 Awesome BBQ Sauces, Rubs and Marinades” to get more recipes including a few of my spice rubs.

  8. Dee January 26, 2015 at 2:58 pm #

    Just made the beef version (patties and breakfast sausages). I’m not vegan nor gluten intolerant, so I used real beef broth, einkorn flour and hemp powder. I also kept the flax seeds whole as the instructions didn’t say to grind them. They are in the fridge now. Will let you know how the turn out!

  9. helovestorun January 23, 2015 at 4:32 pm #

    Looks interesting. I’ll have to give it a try.

  10. neko January 8, 2015 at 5:11 pm #

    What is your favorite brand on pea protein, and nutritional yeast?

    • Rhea January 13, 2015 at 2:43 pm #

      The only brand of pea protein I’ve tried is Source Naturals. I actually avoid nutritional yeast because it gives me migraines.

      • Vandy February 11, 2015 at 3:49 pm #

        Rhea,
        You are a life saver. I recently became Vegan again and I am here to stay. Due to some serious health issues I decided to remove soy and gluten out of my life. These recipes are perfect for me. I am also from the Bronx. Born and raised 1971 to 2011. Living in Florida now. Thanks again and many blessings to you.

        • Rhea February 11, 2015 at 4:31 pm #

          Hi Vandy, nice to meet a fellow Bronxite. I was born there and lived there my whole life until a few years ago. I’m so glad that my recipes can help you. Most of my recipes are gluten-free (though not all) and while I love tofu, I do have a lot that are soy-free as well. Ask if you need any help or direction. xoxo

    • Una May 20, 2015 at 6:13 pm #

      Bragg’s has a nutritional yeast and it is ridiculously expensive and NOW foods also has one. I buy mine in bulk at Whole Paycheck. $10 for a pound vs $12 for 10oz.

  11. Gloria Kolb November 20, 2014 at 10:17 am #

    Rhea,
    Hi i am a gluten free vegan who also has a sensitivity to vegetable oils there a substitutions I could use for the oil or can it be left out help! i would really like to make the V turkey for THANKSGIVING ! Gloria

    • Rhea November 20, 2014 at 11:36 am #

      Hi Gloria, can you have coconut oil? If so, that would work. The point of the oil is to add moisture and tahini or almond butter or peanut butter would also work. When I make seitan ribs, I use those items. Can you have any of those?

  12. Andre November 17, 2014 at 11:20 am #

    I made the v-sausage last night and it was delicious! I finally found amaranth flour and so I didn’t have to replace it with quinoa flour. In the recipe I could not determine when the final five ingredients listed should be added, so I just mixed them in at the end. Very nice, thanks again! Do you prefer the v-sausage or the spicy Italian sausages made with black-eyed peas?

    • Rhea November 17, 2014 at 11:49 am #

      That’s a tough question. I like that the V-Sausage tastes more like the ones you can buy (but are not gluten-free) like Field Roast but the black-eyed pea one is also good and faster to make. If I need to make the one that will get sliced and put into other recipes, I would have to vote V-Sausage.

  13. Loz November 14, 2014 at 11:04 am #

    I made the V beef again with the ingredients this time I had them all and it was great. I made a beef stew with it. It was fine but I wasn’t as keen on how soft the v meat goes in a stew, I prefer it stir fried on its own, it goes crispy and I prefer the taste and texture rather than the soft texture when its cooked in a stew, or other juices. I wondering whether there is a way of being able to make a meat substitute that wouldn’t go soft in a casserole etc! Have to think about it. Does Seitan go soft? Nver had seitan so I don’t know.

    • Diana November 14, 2014 at 3:26 pm #

      I have found Seitan to go soft when cooked in anything with broth. What I’ve found to be the secret is to cube it, fry it, and add it at the very end to individual servings. That way it doesn’t go soft in the leftovers either. 🙂

      • Loz November 14, 2014 at 3:39 pm #

        Okidoki. Yes I did that today. I cubed some and fried it and then quickly stirred it in at the end and it was better, still held a slight crisp to it. I do the same with stir fries. make the stir fry and then top it with the V beef at the end. I am wondering what it is like baked in the oven.

      • Rhea November 17, 2014 at 11:45 am #

        That’s what I do, Diana. Thank you!

    • Rhea November 17, 2014 at 11:45 am #

      Sorry for the late reply, Loz. Seitan does get soft in liquid. I always cook my tempeh, tofu, whatever first, set it aside and then put it back at the end. I’m glad you liked it.

  14. Loz October 28, 2014 at 5:22 pm #

    One question, can this be frozen and used later?

    • Rhea October 28, 2014 at 5:48 pm #

      I have never frozen it but kept it in the fridge several days. If you do freeze it, let me know how it works please.

      • Loz October 30, 2014 at 3:06 pm #

        I froze mine and used it today in a stir fry. It was fine. I stir fried it from frozen, I had cut small strips when I first made it and froze the strips. I love it. Today I made black bean stir fry with it. Next I am going to be a beef stew with it and then my next mission is the v chicken flavour. I was contemplating today, I bet a bacon flavour could be done.

        • Rhea November 4, 2014 at 1:17 pm #

          Hi Loz, I’m so glad that worked. I bet you could make any flavor you like. Good idea! xoxo

        • neko January 8, 2015 at 5:09 pm #

          Housin Sauce, Soy and Liquid smoke is instant bacon flavor.

          • Rhea January 13, 2015 at 2:42 pm #

            Sure is!

  15. Loz October 28, 2014 at 5:06 pm #

    Update. I couldn’t wait until tomorrow to try the beef flavoured v meat I made as mentioned in earlier post. I was in bed and my curiosity got the better of me. I thought, why not, its been chilling in the fridge for a few hours, so I got up, slice a few pieces and quickly stir fried it. Got back into bed with a few pieces, and wow its lovely. Does it taste like beef, I don’t know, I cannot remember what beef taste like, but it is sooooooo tasty, the texture is great, easy to slice into strips for the stir fry, went crispy, but still tender, amazing thank you so much. That is another product I can use to create some more vegan meals. Very creative, I am so happy.

    • Rhea October 28, 2014 at 5:49 pm #

      Loz, I’m so happy you liked it. I hope you try the other types as well. The chicken was my favorite.

      • Loz October 30, 2014 at 3:08 pm #

        I am so happy. Yes Chicken flavour next I just need to get the flour and pea protein.

        • Rhea November 4, 2014 at 1:17 pm #

          Great, Loz. Let me know when you make it! xoxo

  16. Loz October 28, 2014 at 11:51 am #

    I have just made the V meat beef flavour. I made my own beef flavoured broth as I cannot get cubes here. I used hemp protein instead of pea as I haven’t got pea protein. I used Millet flour instead of Soy as I haven’t soy, so we will see. Its sitting for ten minutes then ready to steam. I will know tomorrow how it turns out. I cannot compare with seitan taste as I have never tasted seitan as I am gluten free and new to vegan food. If it taste good then thats good enough for me. I don’t feel to compare, I just look for good tasting healthy food. I will let you know in a couple of days

  17. Diana Lunan October 18, 2014 at 11:54 am #

    I am so happy I came across your site Rhea! My husband and I became vegetarians in January. Its been a challenge as I must eat gluten free. All the good tasting mock meats are not GF. We’ve been trying to get by on just veggie dishes but miss our favorite meat dishes like Pot Roast and fried chicken. Now we can have those too! Cant wait to try your recipes! thank you for all of your hard work in creating this dishes.
    Diana

    • Rhea October 18, 2014 at 8:43 pm #

      Hi Diana, I’m so happy you found me. I understand completely. My husband and I were huge meat eaters. All I ever ate was chicken, I spent my childhood going to the butcher with my mother and eating all meat-centric dishes. My family would go out for ice cream and I wanted a burger or fried chicken. There are some great vegan meats out there but when I became gluten-free, I had to figure out how to keep making my “meaty” vegan dishes. That’s why I figured out the gluten-free Italian sausage on the blog and then tried to make this gluten-free seitan which I think turned out pretty good.

      More companies need to make gluten-free products. Beyond Meat is gluten-free so at least there is a chicken, burger and ground beef option but some people can’t find it and it is expensive. I hope you like V-Meat in all its forms. I did use it to make little fried “chicken” drumsticks which were fun and delicious. Thanks for writing. xoxo

  18. Allison October 17, 2014 at 8:15 am #

    Hi Rhea: The V meat came out good. I noticed after streaming them if I brown the meat it does taste better than just steamed. I made a “beef stew” last night and plan to make some chick’n salad. I never had pea protein and wondered if the taste would be very different then the hemp protein. I guess it would be being a different product. The ribs came out excellent when I added some spices to them and browned them. Next trip to Whole Foods will be pea protein. I plan on getting your e recipes and when is your cookbook coming out or am I behind the times? Thank you and keep up the excellent work.

    • Rhea October 17, 2014 at 9:20 am #

      Hi Allison, I’m so glad you liked it. Yes, you definitely have to cook it further after steaming just as you would seitan. No one would like seitan straight from the pot. I don’t know if hemp protein would be different. I’m not sure it’s the taste so much as the protein content. If you do try it, please let me know.

      My real cookbook is not out yet. I have 3 e-cookbooks and the free preview. Thank you so much for letting me know. xoxo

  19. Allison October 13, 2014 at 5:25 pm #

    Made the sausage, beef and chicken V meat. Excited to see how they come out, I used the hemp protein and would like to try the pea protein in the future. Will bring the turkey V meat to Thanksgiving Day and see how meat eaters respond to the non-turkey. Saved one turkey. Thank you.

    • Rhea October 13, 2014 at 5:29 pm #

      Oh, I hope you like them. Please let me know, Allison. xoxo

  20. Allison October 7, 2014 at 3:50 pm #

    I am so excited to find this site and you have made my day!

    • Rhea October 7, 2014 at 4:16 pm #

      Yay! So glad! xoxo

  21. Andre September 29, 2014 at 3:50 pm #

    It looks like only 2/3 of the water with bouillion ends up in the final dough. Is that right? Thanks! Whole Foods didn’t have amaranth flour, so I used quinoa flour. I found that I needed to steam mine longer. Can’t wait to make it again. I’m planning to double the recipe. I’m going to try battering and frying it to make nuggets thanks!

    • Rhea September 30, 2014 at 5:45 pm #

      Yes, I make extra broth just in case. Quinoa flour has a lot more protein than amaranth. Amaranth is also sweeter. Did it affect the taste at all? Quinoa flour can sometimes be a bit bitter. You can definitely steam it longer. That won’t hurt it. Sometimes I forget about it and it ends up steaming a lot. 🙂 I’m so glad you like it. xoxo

      • Andre October 2, 2014 at 12:16 pm #

        I tripled the recipe since I have large quantities of various flours now. The taste seems fine with quinoa flour instead of amaranth. I’m wondering if it affects the consistency, because both times the finished product seemed too moist. When I sauteed it in a vegetable dish with tamari and lime juice, the v-chicken became wet dough. I’m going to bake some of the finished product to dry it out. Thanks again! I’ll be making this a lot!

        • Rhea October 4, 2014 at 6:20 pm #

          I’m so glad you like it!!

      • Maija Haavisto February 24, 2015 at 12:09 pm #

        Actually they have almost identical amounts of protein, 14% for both (of course there may be differences between different products, but at least some varieties contain the same amount).

        I’m planning to try this with quinoa flour and some other protein – my pea protein has probably expired (and I’ve read it’s not a good idea to eat that one expired), but I have hemp, rice and sacha inchi. Well, soy too, but I don’t like it.

        • Rhea February 26, 2015 at 12:38 pm #

          Maija, I did try quinoa flour when I was experimenting and it had a bitter taste to me. Let me know how your experiments come out. xoxo

  22. Bianca Nguyen July 26, 2014 at 4:54 pm #

    Hello there Rhea,
    I don’t understand the concept of “steaming”, could you further explain how I can steam the logs?

    • Rhea July 26, 2014 at 6:48 pm #

      Hi Bianca, you can set up a big pot with water. Only fill it less than half-way and set a steamer basket on top. Bring the water to a boil and put the foil-covered logs in the basket. Cover it and steam for the time stated. Hope that helps.

  23. rich livingstone April 22, 2014 at 9:56 pm #

    Hi,

    I Live in smaller city just outside of Toronto and wasn’t able to find either amaranth or pea protein so I used brown rice flour as a substitute. Will that be ok or is gonna throw the texture way off. Thanks in advance for any advice you can share.

    • Rhea April 23, 2014 at 9:56 am #

      Hi Rich, when I first tried making V-Meat, I used brown rice flour and chickpea flour. It was ok. I think it was really the chickpea flour that was messing it up (though I love it in anything else). I think soy flour made it taste best. Pea protein is hard to find, I got mine online. I think soy and brown rice would be an ok combo. Let me know how it works out!

      • Rich H April 24, 2014 at 5:49 pm #

        Hi Rhea,

        Oh my GOODNESS I felt so guilty eating the V-Beef .I made ribs and put them on the grill and hit them with some home made BBQ sauce my best friend who’s a die hard meat eater gave me the thumbs up she couldn’t believe it wasn’t meat . I will definitely be making more V-meat goodies for sure.

        • Rhea April 25, 2014 at 10:11 am #

          Yay! Hi Rich, thank you sooo much for the kind words. I’m so glad you loved V-Meat. V-Chicken is my favorite and the sausage. You made my day! xoxo

      • Allison October 13, 2014 at 9:51 am #

        Found pea protein and hemp powder at Whole Foods in the whole body section. Hope this helps.

        • Rhea October 13, 2014 at 5:28 pm #

          Thanks Allison, that’s great!

  24. Alexis April 1, 2014 at 6:47 pm #

    Hey! Does the gluten-free seitan slice deli meat style? Thank you!

    • Rhea April 2, 2014 at 2:18 pm #

      Hi Alexis, I have never tried but I think it would be hard to slice that thinly. It doesn’t have the same texture as seitan.

  25. Barbara March 7, 2014 at 8:08 pm #

    Great ideas and delicious too. Have you tried V-corned beef for St Paddy’s Day?

    • Rhea March 11, 2014 at 3:49 pm #

      I haven’t, Barbara, but it’s something to try. And pastrami too. That was my favorite.

  26. Nathalie February 8, 2014 at 4:07 pm #

    Hi, your recipes look very good, do yo know what I could substitute the soy flour with?

    • Rhea February 8, 2014 at 4:46 pm #

      Hi Nathalie, this is what I wrote in the post “If you need V-Meat to be soy-free, you can simply swap out the soy flour for quinoa flour or rice flour and use Bragg’s coconut aminos instead of soy sauce (when it’s needed). But I will say that I made a few soy-free versions and it does taste a little better with the soy.”

  27. C. February 2, 2014 at 7:02 pm #

    Would quinoa flakes work instead of the oats?

    • Rhea February 4, 2014 at 1:56 pm #

      I can only guess but I would think so. If you try it, please let me know.

  28. Frared February 2, 2014 at 2:41 pm #

    I’ve just made the Italian sausage, and I’m so thrilled with the result.It was much easier than I thought it was going to be, and so incredibly tasty! Thank you!

    • Rhea February 2, 2014 at 3:21 pm #

      Frared, I’m so glad you liked them. Yay! xoxo

  29. Joelle January 25, 2014 at 7:27 pm #

    I live in the MIDDLE OF NOWHERE and need a ferry to get ANYWHERE. Any sub for the pea protein? I have hemp protein powder and about every other flour there is. Would love to try this without having to go to town. Thanks!

    • Rhea January 25, 2014 at 9:54 pm #

      Hi Joelle, you and me both. I haven’t been in a real supermarket in years. I had to order the pea protein from Amazon. I originally made them without it but honestly, it’s better with it. It’s a very high protein powder. You CAN make it without it, just up the other flours to get the same total amount but if you can order it, do. It does make it better. Try it with the hemp powder. I bet that would work just as well and please let me know. Thanks. xoxo

  30. Diana January 9, 2014 at 6:07 pm #

    I have a soy intolerance and my husband is allergic to amaranth. Are there any other flours that will work? I’ve eaten seitan and can eat gluten products, but in the photos the V-meat looks more like the real deal. Just recently became mostly vegetarian.

    • Rhea January 9, 2014 at 7:04 pm #

      Hi Diana,
      Any high-protein flour would work such as quinoa or millet flour. Chickpea, while high protein, did not do well in my tests. But I must say, if you and your husband can eat seitan, why wouldn’t you? It has a better texture than V-Meat in that it’s softer and a bit chewier. It’s really hard to get that meaty texture without gluten. But if you do try V-Meat, I’d go with quinoa flour, millet flour, brown rice flour and the pea protein.

      • Diana January 10, 2014 at 11:28 am #

        Hi Rhea,
        Thank you for your reply 🙂 I’ll try another flour. We do like seitan but also love variety. Last night was a lentil mushroom shepherd’s pie that was very, very yummy.

  31. Teresa January 1, 2014 at 4:21 pm #

    This is SO exciting! I am vegan with a gluten intolerance (which I sometimes ignore); I’ve been looking at a lot of recipes lately that include seitan. I’m so very excited to give these a shot! Thank you, thank you!

    • Rhea January 1, 2014 at 6:24 pm #

      Hi Teresa, I hope it provides another option for you. I ignore my intolerance too, I’m afraid. xoxo

  32. Beth December 22, 2013 at 10:46 am #

    Making this now, but I had one question: what is the last 1/3 cup broth used for? Or is it just extra? I’m using “ham” seasoning from another site, and subbing the soy with quinoa, etc. I’ll let you know how it turns out–fingers crossed!

    • Rhea December 22, 2013 at 11:50 am #

      Hi Beth, yes, it’s extra. Just in case. One cube is good for one or two cups water. I keep the extra in the fridge for the next time I need broth. My fingers are crossed too!!!!

  33. Kevin December 20, 2013 at 2:15 am #

    Are the flax seeds ground?

    • Rhea December 20, 2013 at 12:56 pm #

      Yes, Kevin. I’m sorry, I’ve got to remember to write that. Thanks 🙂

  34. Glenda December 18, 2013 at 10:52 am #

    Hi Rhea, Just wondering what the nutritional yeast adds to the recipe? Would it be possible to leave it out or substitute it with something else?

    • Rhea December 18, 2013 at 12:00 pm #

      Hi Glenda, the nutritional yeast adds a little flavor but you can definitely leave it out. I usually do because it gives me the most horrible headaches. Tom actually hid it from me so I can’t use it 🙂

  35. Mark Milligan December 10, 2013 at 10:54 pm #

    Sounds Great! but Where do you get Beef and chicken flavored bouillon that is Vegan??? never heard of such a thing?

    • Rhea December 11, 2013 at 1:47 am #

      Hi Mark, there are bouillon cubes and broths that are “chicken” or “beef” flavored, not chicken or beef flavored. They use spices and herbs that are familiar to those animal flavors – like sage and thyme for chicken, probably tomato and soy for beef. You don’t have to use those cubes. I’ve made seitan for years just throwing in those familiar herbs and spices but if you really want it to taste like beef or chicken, they work well. Also for soups. Edward and Son make them. I’m sure there are other brands. You can order directly from Edward and Son or Pangea (veganstore.com) or Vegan Essentials.

  36. Laura December 9, 2013 at 11:21 pm #

    Can’t wait to try these! One of the hardest parts about staying vegan and having a gluten intolerance, is that I feel I miss out on so many options. Anyhow, thank you for your hard work!!

    • Rhea December 10, 2013 at 3:27 pm #

      Laura, however I can help, let me know. I find being gluten-free mostly frustrating when I try to eat out. That’s when getting vegan and gluten-free is a real challenge but at home, it’s not bad. Just have to stock up on all the GF versions of things. Really, let me know if I can help! 🙂

  37. Amanda December 9, 2013 at 8:41 pm #

    What I’ve been waiting for! OK, so now I have to get some pea protein and amaranth flour but apart from that, I actually have everything else! You’re a genius, Rhea!!!!! <3

    • Rhea December 10, 2013 at 3:33 pm #

      No, not a genius. Just hungry! 🙂

  38. Michele Coccaro Benedict December 9, 2013 at 4:12 pm #

    Cannot wait to try these! I was just telling my sister about this she said you can make a MINT selling these meats. 🙂
    xo Michele

    • Rhea December 9, 2013 at 4:34 pm #

      I just hope you like them! xoxo

  39. Heather December 9, 2013 at 3:44 pm #

    Wow! Stoked to try this.. One question, it says 1/4 pea protien..is that 1/4 cup?

    • Rhea December 9, 2013 at 3:53 pm #

      Yes, Heather, it is. Thank you for catching that. I fixed it. xoxo

      • Greg August 24, 2015 at 1:55 pm #

        Can it be pea flour or has to be pea protein? The only pea protein I can find is flavored for supplements.

        • Rhea August 29, 2015 at 4:57 pm #

          I have only tried it using pea protein. I’m not sure if pea flour is the same thing. I don’t think it is. The pea protein I used is the kind you put in smoothies as a supplement. xoxo

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